Much Ado About Nothing (no thing, noting)

Noting

Another motif is the play on the words nothing and noting, which in Shakespeare’s day were homophones.[13] Taken literally, the title implies that a great fuss (“much ado”) is made of something which is insignificant (“nothing”), such as the unfounded claims of Hero’s infidelity. The title could also be understood as Much Ado About Noting. Much of the action is in interest in and critique of others, written messages, spying, and eavesdropping. This is mentioned several times, particularly concerning “seeming”, “fashion”, and outward impressions. Nothing is a double entendre, “an O-thing” (or “n othing” or “no thing”) was Elizabethan slang for “vagina”, evidently derived from the pun of a woman having “nothing” between her legs.[14][4] [15]

Examples of noting as noticing occur in the following instances: (1.1.131–132)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Much_Ado_About_Nothing

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *